Reagan National Gate, terminal changes begin Saturday


Major changes are coming to Reagan National Airport this weekend that may confuse frequent travelers at first. Here’s what you need to know.

Gates 1 to 9 will become gates A1 to A9; Gates 10 to 22 will become gates B10 to B22. Etc.

Courtesy of the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority

Next week, Terminals A and B/C will simply become Terminals 1 and 2.

Courtesy of the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority

Here’s a look at the changes beginning this weekend at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.

Courtesy of the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority

Major changes are coming to Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Va. this weekend that may confuse frequent travelers at first.

All door numbers will have a letter in front of them from Saturday.



For example, gates 1 to 9 will become gates A1 to A9; Gates 10 to 22 will become gates B10 to B22.

“No airlines or gates will move, but this is a signage improvement,” said Crystal Nosal, spokeswoman for the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, which oversees the airport.

Due to the airport’s recent upgrades and expansions, Nosal said it will make “navigating around the airport more intuitive.”

“These signage improvements should help travelers navigate the terminals,” Nosal said. “Updating the airport-wide signs is the next logical step in our build.”

On Sunday, airlines are expected to reflect gate changes on boarding passes and flight information on screens.

Then, next week, Terminals A and B/C will become Terminals 1 and 2.

All of the changes will involve the removal of more than 1,000 signs inside and outside the airport.

In October, a groundbreaking ceremony marked the “major completion” of a billion-dollar improvement project at Reagan National.

The project involved two new security screening buildings located above the arrivals road.

“For the first time, Reagan National will have a space specifically designated and designed for TSA security,” said Jack Potter, president and CEO of the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority.

The improvement project, called Project Journey, came about because the airport had been operating well beyond its planned capacity before the coronavirus pandemic hit.

The Journey project included the creation of a concourse that replaced the infamous 35X gate, which required travelers to board buses and wait on the tarmac.

This new competition opened its doors in April.

“The only thing more inefficient than Congress,” Virginia Senator Mark Warner said, “was Gate 35X.”

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